The Not-So-Secret World of the Dark Web

Far below the Web we all know and love, behind the friendly faces of our favorite websites there lies a lurking giant. Many of us know the Web by it’s biggest names – Facebook, Twitter, Google, etc. But what many of us don’t know is that there’s another component to the Web, one that willingly places itself away from the public consciousness. It’s given rise to a platform where people around the world can speak freely without fear of retribution, but it’s also given rise to a platform where people can engage in incredible atrocities outside of the public eye. This mysterious hidden network is known as the Dark Web.

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Beginner’s Guide to Backups

Backups are something most people never think about until it’s too late. Computers can be finicky, and if you value your digital data then you’ll want to have a backup solution in place. This post explores two aspects of backups: the various types of backups, and everyday tools for performing those backups.

Disclaimer: Parts of this guide include instructions that, if misused, could result in data loss. Never run a command without being 100% sure of the outcome!

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Contain Your Excitement: Building Portable Apps with Docker

Installing programs is something most people take for granted. How could it be easier – you simply download an installation file, run it, answer a few prompts, and before you know it you have a fresh new application ready to go. This is fine for a single-user system like a laptop or desktop, but what happens when you want to share that program with someone else, or migrate it – along with its configuration and settings – to a different computer? What if you wanted to do a clean reinstall without having to hunt for scattered or leftover files? Better yet, what if you could run the application in a completely self-contained environment without it affecting your main system? Docker provides a unique way of accomplishing this, and the technology behind it is quickly gaining traction. Continue reading

Private Server Part 7: Wrap-Up, Tips, and Tweaks

Congratulations, you’ve made it this far! You have a server powered by open-source software that you can access from anywhere in the world, safely and securely. Now that you have a solid foundation in Linux and networking, you can start playing with different applications and services. Our final post will look at some tips for making the most out of your new server.

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Private Server Part 6: Public Access, Advanced Networking, and Advanced Security

Network

If you’ve been following the previous steps of this guide, you should have a secure, freshly updated installation of Ubuntu Server which you can access from another computer on the network using SSH. If that’s the case, you can safely unplug the keyboard and monitor from your server – you won’t be needing them. If you’re running your server behind a router (e.g., on a home network), chances are your server won’t be accessible from the outside world. This section explains how to make your server available to the public Internet so you can access it from home or while on the go.

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Private Server Part 5: Web Hosting, ownCloud, and Subsonic

At this point, you should be able to access your server through your local network. You won’t be able to access it from the Internet, but don’t worry about that just yet. There are a couple of important security steps before your server goes public that we’ll get to later. In the meantime, let’s focus on the real reason you’re here: hosting your own file sync and music streaming services locally.

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Private Server Part 2: Installing the Operating System

You have a big box full of complicated-looking electronics, a monitor, a keyboard, and cords going all over the place. Now what? If hardware can be considered the body of the computer, then the operating system can be considered its soul. The operating system acts as an interpreter between you and the hardware, translating your actions into instructions that the machinery can understand. It does everything from reading the keys you type to displaying text on the screen. More importantly, it’s what turns a pile of metal and silicone into what we consider a modern computer.
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